Kosher: Fact vs. Fiction


KOSHER: FACT VS. FICTION

No, Kosher does not mean, “blessed by a Rabbi.” And Kosher also doesn’t mean, “holy”, or any of that hocus pocus. The word “kosher” means “fit” or “proper”, meaning that the item properly meets the dietary requirements of Jewish law. A rabbi or G-d fearing person with the knowledge of the laws certifies the following:
• Milk and meat are not mixed.
• Only certain animals and fish are kosher. Rodents, insects, shellfish, and pork are not allowed.

• A specialized slaughtering process is used to make meat Kosher.

NEW HOT FOOD TREND- CHOOSING KOSHER FOR HEALTH

A whopping 62% of Kosher consumers buy certified Kosher products for health and quality and not for religious needs. Kosher food, because of stringent laws, is cleaner, safer, tastes better, >and is of higher quality. With Kosher food, you know what is in the food and what is not, unlike non-kosher items that may slip in ingredients without as much supervision. The FDA allows an ingredient that is less than 2% of the recipe not to be disclosed, while Kosher standards do not allow any unnamed ingredients to be included.
To certify food as Kosher, a great amount of supervision is required. This careful process ensures cleaner and safer products because it slows down the production of food and allows government and rabbinic supervisors a keen look at every stage of the process.
Meat has very high standards and intricate laws to be certified as Kosher.

• Only certain animals are acceptable according to Jewish law.

• Special, more humane ways of slaughtering cause less pain to animals.

• The meat is salted in a specialized process that removes much of the bacteria.

• No sick animals are certified as Kosher.

• The equipment is carefully cleaned often to ensure perfect Kosher standards.

Weigh the benefits of certified Kosher and see for yourself- Kosher is the way to go!